Bangkok Sunset Ride

Bangkok Sunset Ride is a very gentle culinary and cultural bicycle ride through Bangkok and Thonburi side. Experience the Thai capital at night during this amazing bicycle adventure.  Ride through quiet and safe back roads and small lane ways. Visit ancient temples and the flower market after sunset. The places you visit are somehow more magical at night, with many temples beautifully illuminated in the evening.

per adult from

$84

AUD

Duration

4 hours

Voucher

Mobile ticket

Select Date and Travellers

No tour options available.

  • What's included :
    • Use of bicycle and helmet
    • Local guide
    • Dinner, snacks and bottled water
    What's excluded :
    • Alcoholic drinks during dinner (available to purchase)
    • Personal expenses and gratuities (recommended)
    • Hotel pick-up and drop-off
  • This is a typical itinerary for this product

    Stop At: Recreational Bangkok Biking, Baan Sri Kung, 350/151 Rama III Road, Soi 71, Bangkok 10120 Thailand

    Our professional cycling-guide will lead you through a maze of back-street roads and feed you lots of information.

    Duration: 4 hours

    Pass By: Chao Phraya River, 780/488 Charoen Krung Road, Bang Kho Laem, Bangkok 10120 Thailand

    Like all urban rivers, the history of the Chao Phraya is intertwined with the city it flows through. The original site was chosen by early settlers because of its fertility and abundant fish. Later King Taksin, after the fall of Ayutthaya to the Burmese, located his new capital here, on the western banks today known as Thonburi. In 1782 King Rama I, finding the eastern banks more favourable, founded modern Bangkok and celebrated the occasion by building some of the world's most beguiling temples. Later still the canals it feeds became famous, earning Bangkok its 'Venice of the East' epithet. And, meanwhile, eminent Western authors like Maugham, Conrad and Coward were singling out the Chao Phraya as one of their favourite spots in the Far East.

    Stop At: Kian Un Keng Shrine, Soi Wat Kanlaya Wat Kanlaya, Thon Buri, Bangkok 10600 Thailand

    One of the oldest shrines in Thonburi, Kuan An Keng has been praised for its perfectly preserved wooden carvings and mural paintings. The shrine was awarded Best Architectural Preserve by the Association of Siamese Architects in 2008. At the center of the sacred venue is a statue of Guanying, the Chinese goddess of mercy. The shrine also has an open-air roof that’s reflective of traditional Chinese-style architecture.

    Duration: 2 minutes

    Stop At: Santa Cruz Church, 112 Thesaban 1 Rd. Wat Kalaya, Thon Buri, Bangkok 10600 Thailand

    A legacy of solid Portuguese-Siamese relations, Santa Cruz Church still stands strong on the west bank. In the 1500s, Portugal signed a treaty with Ayutthaya that would lead to centuries of friendship. The Portuguese were to supply firearms and weaponries while the Siamese granted them the rights to live, work, and play in Thailand. With this also came their freedom to practice their religion. When the fall of Ayutthaya came in 1767, the Portuguese continued to support to King Taksin in driving the Burmese out of Siam and even followed him to the new capital site in present day Bangkok.

    Upon arrival, the Portuguese were given land to build their communities. On Thonburi side, Santa Cruz Church was established and quickly became a center for Catholics. However, the Portuguese were soon to be splintered into two groups. One decided to follow the leadership of the French clergy that established the Santa Cruz church in Thonburi while the other rejected it to go off on their own and eventually built a sister church Holy Rosary Church on the opposite bank.

    Duration: 5 minutes

    Stop At: Temple Of Dawn (Wat Arun), 158 Thanon Wang Doem, Wat Arun, Bangkok Yai, Bangkok 10600 Thailand

    Wat Arun, locally known as Wat Chaeng, is situated on the west (Thonburi) bank of the Chao Phraya River. It is easily one of the most stunning temples in Bangkok, not only because of its riverside location, but also because the design is very different to the other temples you can visit in Bangkok. Wat Arun (or temple of the dawn) is partly made up of colourfully decorated spires and stands majestically over the water. Wat Arun is almost directly opposite Wat Pho, so it is very easy to get to. Although it is known as the Temple of the Dawn, it's absolutely stunning at sunset, particularly when lit up at night. The quietest time to visit. Given beauty of the architecture and the fine craftsmanship it is not surprising that Wat Arun is considered by many as one of the most beautiful temples in Thailand. The spire (prang) on the bank of Chao Phraya River is one of Bangkok's world-famous landmarks. It has an imposing spire over 70 metres high, beautifully decorated with tiny pieces of coloured glass and Chinese porcelain placed delicately into intricate patterns. Wat Arun was envisioned by King Taksin in 1768. It is believed that after fighting his way out of Ayutthaya, which was taken over by a Burmese army at the time, he arrived at this temple just as dawn was breaking. He later had the temple renovated and renamed it Wat Chaeng, the Temple of the Dawn. It used to be the home of the Emerald Buddha, before the capital and Palace was moved to the other side of the river. This can now be seen at the Grand Palace. The central prang was extended during the reign of Rama III (between 1824 and 1851), and is now one of the most visited sites in Thailand. It was also Rama III who added the decoration of the spires with porcelain, so that they glimmer in the sunshine.

    Duration: 15 minutes

    Stop At: Wat Phra Chetuphon, 2 Sanamchai Road Grand Palace Subdistrict, Pranakorn District, Bangkok 10200 Thailand

    Wat Pho (the Temple of the Reclining Buddha), or Wat Phra Chetuphon, is located behind the Temple of the Emerald Buddha and a must-do for any visitor in Bangkok. It's one of the largest temple complexes in the city and famed for its giant reclining Buddha that measures 46 metres long and is covered in gold leaf.

    The highlight for most people visiting Wat Pho is the Reclining Buddha. The figures here are impressive: 15 metres tall, 46 metres long, so large it feels like it has been squeezed into the building. The Buddha's feet are 5 metres long and exquisitely decorated in mother-of-pearl illustrations of auspicious 'laksanas' (characteristics) of the Buddha. 108 is a significant number, referring to the 108 positive actions and symbols that helped lead Buddha to perfection. You’ll need to take your shoes off to enter, and if you would like a little good luck, we recommend purchasing a bowl of coins at the entrance of the hall which you can drop in the 108 bronze bowls which line the length of the walls. Dropping the small pennies in makes a nice ringing sound and even if your wishes don’t come true, the money goes towards helping the monks renovate and preserve Wat Pho. As this is a revered image, all visitors must wear appropriate clothing; this means no exposed shoulders or skin above the knee. As we said before, it really is worth taking a look round the rest of the temple. Recommend sites include four chapels that contain 394 gilded Buddha images, long lines of golden statues from different parts of Thailand sitting in the lotus position. Although the intricately detailed murals that cover the walkways around Wat Pho will require a book or guide to decipher, the exquisite murals are so detailed and intricate that even if you don’t understand all the imagery you can still appreciate the artwork. Finally in the courtyards at Wat Pho Temple are some comical looking Chinese statutes that were once uses as ballasts on ships and 91 chedis (or stupas) decorated in ceramic pottery flowers and colourful tiles. Please do note that in the evening Wat Pho is closed so we can't go in to the building with the reclining Buddha.

    Duration: 15 minutes

    Pass By: Wat Rakang Kositaram, 250 Arun Amarin Road, Kwang Sirirach, Khet Bangkok Noi, Bangkok 10700 Thailand

    Wat Rakhang Khositaram, formerly known as Wat Bang Wa Yai, is an Ayutthaya period temple. During the Thon Buri period, the temple was reconstructed and upgraded as a royal temple by King Taksin the Great who ordered the construction of a palace in the area. The temple then became the residence of the Supreme Patriarch. Later in the reign of King Rama I the Great, a bell was discovered at Wat Bang Wa Yai. This bell was moved to Wat Phra Kaeo and five replacement bells were then built. The temple was named “Wat Rakhang Khositaram or Temple of the Bells” because of this discovery.

    Pass By: The Grand Palace, Na Phra Lan Rd, Maharaj Pier next to Wat Phra Kaeo Temple Complex, Bangkok Thailand

    Wat Phra Kaew or the Temple of the Emerald Buddha (officially known as Wat Phra Sri Rattana Satsadaram) is regarded as the most important Buddhist temple in Thailand. Located in the historic centre of Bangkok, within the grounds of the Grand Palace, it enshrines Phra Kaew Morakot (the Emerald Buddha), the highly revered Buddha image meticulously carved from a single block of jade. The Emerald Buddha (Phra Putta Maha Mani Ratana Patimakorn) is a Buddha image in the meditating position in the style of the Lanna school of the north, dating from the 15th century AD.

    Stop At: Sanam Luang, North of Wat Phra Kaew, Bangkok Thailand

    Sanam Luang Park - Situated at the heart of Rattanakosin Island, Sanam Luang (the Royal Field) has been in existence since the founding of Bangkok (in 1782). The area was also known as 'Thung Pra Meru' (Royal Cremation Ground), because it was originally used for royal cremations up until the reign of King Rama III, when the king decreed that all cremations be held outside the old city walls. Surrounded by famous attractions, such as the Grand Palace, Temple of the Emerald Buddha, the National Museum, National Gallery, the Supreme Court, and Ministry of Defense, Sanam Luang is a gathering ground for various activities throughout the year. Take part in the kite flying festival around March and see a plethora of colours in different shapes and sizes floating in the sky. Alternatively, have a family picnic in breezy late afternoon while watching an exciting game of sepak takraw (Asian football).

    Duration: 5 minutes

    Stop At: Pak Khlong Talat (Flower Market), Jakkrapet Road, Bangkok 10200 Thailand

    Bangkok Flower Market (Pak Klong Talad) is the biggest wholesale and retail fresh flower market in Bangkok. The market has all kinds of popular flowers and flora-related items, including roses, forget me nots, orchids, lilies and more. Most of them sold in packs of 50 or 100 flowers in each, and prices are amazingly cheap. Part of the Old City, Bangkok Flower market is located on Chak Phet Road near Saphan Phut or the Memorial Bridge. Shops and vendors are housed inside two to three-storey shop-houses on both sides of the main road. The market lies just south of Wat Pho (Temple of the Reclining Buddha) and has access to a river pier, so it makes for a great one-day trip when combined with other historical attractions in the Old City.

    Duration: 10 minutes

    Pass By: Chinatown - Bangkok, Yaowarat Road Samphanthawong, Samphanthawong, Bangkok 10100 Thailand

    Bangkok’s Chinatown is a popular tourist attraction and a food haven for new generation gourmands who flock here after sunset to explore the vibrant street-side cuisine. At day time, it’s no less busy, as hordes of shoppers descend upon this 1-km strip and adjacent Charoenkrung Road to get a day’s worth of staple, trade gold, or pay a visit to one of the Chinese temples. Packed with market stalls, street-side restaurants and a dense concentration of gold shops, Chinatown is an experience not to miss. The energy that oozes from its endless rows of wooden shop-houses is plain contagious – it will keep you wanting to come back for more. Plan your visit during major festivals, like Chinese New Year, and you will see Bangkok Chinatown at its best.

  • Departure Point :
    Royal Orchid Sheraton Hotel & Towers, 2 Charoen Krung Road Soi 30 (Captain Bush Lane Siphya, Khwaeng Bang Rak, Khet Bang Rak, Krung Thep Maha Nakhon 10500, Thailand
    Departure Time :
    5:30 PM
    Return Detail :
    Returns to original departure point
    Hotel Pickup :
    • Confirmation will be received at time of booking
    • Minimum age is 12 years
    • A minimum of 2 people per booking is required
    • Maximum of 8 people per booking
    • Since you are visiting a Buddhist temple (Wat Pho), you are expected to dress respectfully. We recommend you to wear longer shorts (knees covered) and to have your shoulders covered when we enter the temple.
    • This tour/activity will have a maximum of 8 travelers
    • Face masks required for travelers in public areas
    • Face masks required for guides in public areas
    • Social distancing enforced throughout experience
    • Gear/equipment sanitized between use
    • Guides required to regularly wash hands
  • You can present either a paper or an electronic voucher for this activity.
  • For a full refund, cancel at least 24 hours in advance of the start date of the experience.

Language

English

Age Req.

-

Fitness Req.

None

Group Size

8

Organised by Recreational Bangkok Biking Company

Activity ID: V-7714P5

More like this

Is this your business?

If this is your business, Claim Your Listing so you can manage and update your profile through our Business Portal.

Or you can improve this listing by Suggesting an Edit .